October 24, 2010

Warhol copies Brillo, someone copies Warhol: Hijinks ensue!

Warhol_brillo

Over 100 of Andy Warhol's "Brillo Boxes" have been found to be "different" from others...
Yes it's a rather strong claim - The board avoids using words such as “fake” or “inauthentic” in its report, nor would it say whether or not it will stamp any boxes presented to it as “denied”, or revoke existing letters of opinion.

 

The short story:

Two series of boxes produced by Pontus Hultén, the founding director of the Moderna Museet in Stockholm, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art. Hultén claimed that Warhol authorised the production of the boxes for the seminal exhibition that Hultén curated in Stockholm in 1968.

But in 2007, the Swedish newspaper Expressen discovered that no wooden boxes had been displayed in the show and that cardboard boxes from the Brillo factory had been used instead. It set out to research the date and manufacture of Hultén’s boxes, many of which had entered the market.

Vitrine
Anyhow - the prices climb and climb and climb - are auctioned off (they had letters of authenticity and papers and important people saying they are real). Ten were sold through Christie’s shortly afterwards to a UK buyer for £475,650, who turned out to be the art dealer Anthony d’Offay.

Aw__brillo_boxes

The board now says there are two sets of Hultén-­produced boxes: a small number (about 10 to 15) made in 1968, straight after the show. The board refers to these as “Stockholm type boxes”. The rest, 105, were produced at Hultén’s request by carpenters for a 1990 exhibition in Russia. The board refers to these as “Malmö type boxes”.

Full story here at The Art Newspaper

BRILLO_2

October 20, 2010

Has the art market thawed? Frieze thinks so.

5081576167_1d4cb53b79photo above from Everyday Lifestyle

Just in case you don't have your finger on the pulse of the art world, here's the skinny.  There are a series of "Art Fairs" in major cities all over the world that take place annually or biannually.  Galleries apply and pay a substantial amount of money to rent a "stall", and in turn sell artwork to the public. These fairs are massive cultural meccas - full of art, talks, panel discussions, performances, awards, and contemporary musings on current educational platforms and art-making in general. In short, it's a total playground for new and emerging ideas and practices as well as established ideas and concepts.

5079153001_9b52803812 photo above from Everyday Lifestyle

Each year, thousands of collectors come in droves to these fairs - so smaller fairs have popped up around the bigger fairs and are populated by the galleries who were rejected from the bigger fairs, or simply didn't want to pay the premiums. These smaller fairs have leveled the playing ground somewhat, but there is a status symbol to being included in the big-deal fairs like Basel, The Armory, Frieze, Cologne,...

For example, the Frieze Art Fair takes place every October in Regent’s Park, London. The fair showcases new and established artists to an international audience (the complete list of exhibitors is here) over 170 galleries were exhibiting work this year, with miles and miles of labyrinth-like temporary walls studded with works - some hung so heavily that you wonder how the wall stays vertical.

5092542699_b50e00448d_b photo above from Visionet

There are more galleries than ever this year and a higher quality of applicants,' says Frieze co-founder Amanda Sharp, who, when she set up the annual art fair eight years ago, never in her wildest dreams thought it would become such a London blockbuster. (from Wallpaper magazine)

Stories like this one are not uncommon: "New business is what makes fairs worth it, otherwise we could just stay in our galleries and work on our shows,” said Rachel Lehmann (B13). The gallerist sold only to new clients, including Jennifer Steinkamp’s Orbit 8, 2010 (shown below) (all three editions plus the artist’s proof), for $55,000 each." (From TheArtNewspaper.com's article here)

1286654223_4f5ba118_iphone(above: Jennifer Steinkamp, Orbit 8, 2010)

Andreas Geiger at Sprüth Magers (B9) summed up the overall feeling: “People are acquiring, but there’s no more five-minute buying. The market has found a good pace, it’s not crazy, but it’s solid.” (The Art Newspaper)

But it's not all about selling - it's about seeing and learning. There are a series of talks and educational events, concerts and performances, and prizes awarded to Artists and Galleries. There are also a series of Artist Projects - including Jeffrey Vallance among others.

"The coveted Cartier Award is open to artists living outside of the UK, up to five years from graduating from an undergraduate or postgraduate degree or under thirty years of age. The Cartier Award is organized by Frieze Projects, sponsored by Cartier and presented in collaboration with Gasworks. The recipient of the prize will have the unique opportunity to present their work at Frieze Art Fair 2010, guaranteeing a major international audience. Additionally the prize will cover production costs of up to £10,000, an artist’s fee, per diems, travel expenses and a studio residency at Gasworks in London from August to October 2010." (from Art Knowledge News)

Bridget Riley was one of the featured "conversations" of the Frieze Art Fair, she spoke with Michael Bracewell about her lifetime of artmaking and development of her signature style. Many of the talks are available here as podcasts.

Riley_largeweb(above: Bridget Riley)

 

Enjoy!

October 13, 2010

RIP Joan Sutherland

Your voice is a design that makes an empty room full.

October 07, 2010

Tulip Chair Shoes :: Kobi Levi

1Admit it.  These Saarinen Tulip Chair-inspired shoes are pretty freaking fantastic.  Impractical, yes.  But there's a little part of you that loves the ridiculousness of it all, right?  Created by the very talented shoe designer Kobi Levi - be sure to check out the rest of his portfolio!

2 Also, a big thank you to Jeni for sending this my way!  [Jeni owns and operates Stitched Cards.  Check out her Chairs, Etc. series, a collection of greeting cards featuring iconic Mid-Century Modern furniture and accessories!]

So, what other furniture-inspired fashions have you seen?  Share in the comments!

October 06, 2010

Beauty and Timelessness Meets Function

photo
BMW R75/5  c.1972
photo
(detail)
photo
BMW R62 c.1928
photo
Although classic simplicity is not a new thing, it's a style and aesthetic that's covertly stood the test of time, in fact almost a century in the case of BMW Motorcycles! This simple aesthetic still exists in most people's minds, ours included, as such a solid thought. None of the thinking of the early Triumph motorcycles are around in any solid form. It's a timeless classic because of the sound thinking and approach behind it's design, form follows function, a tenant of the Bauhaus aesthetic, while managing to be incredibly beautiful, something can be beautiful simply because of it's functional qualities. It's not about making the outside thing pretty, it's about making the soul pretty. The true beauty arrives from it's functional nature.
At the root of the Bauhaus aesthtic was Occam's Razor, an engineering and deisgn principal that espoused the act of cutting away that which doesn't function or what's not absolutely essential to the perfect functioning of the piece. It's about editing, not about adding, a reduction, having the idea of 'motorcycle' in your head and then reducing. To this day a model exists with 2 horizontally opposed cylinders, two wheels and a drive shaft, the R1200R, although computer technology and emmissions regulations have added a burden to it's simplicity, the original idea is still there.
The BMW R62 you see above was brought to the USA from Munich after 30 yrs of being hidden under a canvas tarp in the back of a repair shop, treasured like aging wine. The first attempt after uncovering it got it running again and functional. Consider other things of the time period, the Titanic! Think steamdriven archaic practice, there are no more steam driven luxury liners plying the seas but there's still BMW motorcycles, quietly whispering down the interstate...
photo

The orginal owner of the BMW R62 felt the need to attach a medallion of St. Christopher, the patron saint of travellers, to the front fender. Although I'm sure with further experience of his new purchase, like Occam, he would have found the medallion was an unneccessary addition, as the bike itself was a guardian Saint of travellers.

2Modern Design Brief

Modern Art moments...all kinds of art make me happy. I have a soft spot in my heart for people who can express their words in this type of medium. Funky, classic, off-beat, simple-I love it ALL!

Picture 1
Design Milk featured NY interior designer, Laura Day . This image reminded me of my fondness for art...read the whole story here. LOVE the skate decks above the bed. Back in the day, I had a few above my bed and always loved that look. 

44193_438819776555_10245586555_5535496_796614_n
Even the word 'ART' makes my heart tingle...if I ever have a son, his name just may be Art...

Minelli_contradictions_twitter-thumb-525xauto-16580
Social Networking sarcasm...spotted on MocoLoco. Art by Filippo Minelli.

98_simonschubert_ef_31810_a2
Stunning Paper Artworks by a German artist, Simon Schubert. See the whole feature here on Wallpaper.

Installation-chair-art-design
Installation art is one of my favorites. Pushing limits and boundaries is always the mark of an interesting artist.... Found this one on dornob. 1600 Stacked chairs...curious why she stopped at 1600...She IS the artist- it's all up to her!

 

October 05, 2010

Jens Risom’s Classics

The 94 year old Danish-American designer Jens Risom has entered a collaboration with Rocket Gallery in London.

Risom_1

Benchmark has secured the production rights to re-launch Jens Risoms classics from the 1950s and 60s. Risom was born in Denmark in 1916 and went to Design School with Hans J. Wegner and Børge Mogensen, but migrated to the US at the age of 23. He was based in New York where he founded Jens Risom Design in 1949. The first collection of nine furniture classics is exhibited at Rocket Gallery – www.rocketgallery.com

Risom_2www.jensrisom.com

 

October 04, 2010

How To Be Alone

I wish more people would allow themselves the time and space to make such a beautiful gift. Thank you Andrea Dorfman and Tanya Davis...

October 02, 2010

Art + Design = Life

Handmade
(Etsy: ArgyleWhale)

When it comes to design, we forget that it is handmade, just in a different way.

Certainly this had some labor involved in its making.

NYT-chairs
(NYT Logo - made of chairs)

But design can be fun and lite (or light).

Beachball-lights

Design can be inspired from anywhere and anything.

Helen-of-tartlette-color-food

Ikea has put out a visually stunning cookbook (notcot.org) titled: Homemade is Best

Recipe1
Recipe2
Recipe3
Recipe4

Is this the future? Will everything be broken down into a global visual language?

Future

Which begs the question:

Good_infodesign_5501

Design + life = unexpected delights in everyday life
(blend of hand-made, mass-produced, creative applications)


Jpg_WELCOME_HOME_HD-d5483

Remember:

Everything is going to be alright

That goes for everyone. (below: Kumi Yamashita)

Kumi-yamashita-faces-swatches 

And anyone.
After all, this is our world.

Richard-galpin-2006_noosphere

(above: Richard Galpin, "Noosphere", 2006)

September 30, 2010

Sentry :: Andy Freeberg

1
I am totally digging this photographic series by Andy Freeberg, entitled "Sentry".  I don't know how many times I've walked into spaces like this - always with an over-sized, white reception desk, it seems - and had this same experience.  The top of a head, the absence of a "hello", and the feeling of an unnecessary disconnect.  Have you experienced this?  Share your thoughts and/or reactions to this series in the comments.

2
Artist's Statement:

It was an odd moment when I walked into that first gallery in Chelsea and saw a large white desk with a head poking up from the top edge of the computer screen. I took out my camera, carefully framing and exposing the scene, and the head never moved or took notice of my gaze. As I walked around that booming Chelsea neighborhood of art galleries, I began to notice a trend: at some of the biggest galleries there are giant entry desks, where the top of the head of the desk sitter is often the only other human presence. This leads me to wonder, in this digital world of email and instant messaging that supposedly makes us more connected, are we also setting up barriers to the simple eye to eye contact that affirms our humanity?

See the whole series here.  More pics after the jump.

Continue reading "Sentry :: Andy Freeberg" »

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